Eventide Pitch Factor: Not Just for Guitarists

So people at AES were telling me, "You gotta see the Eventide Pitch Factor." My initial reaction was that while it's great that Eventide brings their 30+ year legacy of being the top name in harmonization and pitch shifting within
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So people at AES were telling me, "You gotta see the Eventide Pitch Factor." My initial reaction was that while it's great that Eventide brings their 30+ year legacy of being the top name in harmonization and pitch shifting within the reach of regular musicians via their "Factor" stompboxes, that they were for guitar and bass players more than keyboardists.

I was totally wrong, and now I'm quite happy to have been totally wrong. Though Russell demos the Pitch Factor using a bass guitar in these videos, it has stereo inputs that make it suitable for use with today's synths. But that's just the tip of the iceberg, as you'll see and hear. You tell it what key you're playing in, you tell it major or minor, and it becomes sensitive to modes and scales in terms of the new pitches it creates based on your playing. Then, you can make those pitches come in at tap-delay-like intervals relative to the notes you're actually playing. 

In the second (shorter) video, Russell shows off that it has dual 16-step sequencer / arpeggiators! That cinched it for me. This thing is more like a module--meaning something you'd find in a modular synthesizer--than an "effect pedal." In fact, if Eventide wanted to make a really smart marketing move, they'd make a version that fits into a Euro or A100 rack and really slam that perception home. The thing is that cool, and if you've ever met a true modular synth fanatic, you know that $499 isn't that much money in their eyes. Nor should it be in yours if you're just running your Voyager, Electro, or whatnot through this bad boy. It really is that cool

Trouble seeing the video below? Click here.