Teeny tiny models of synthesizers that never were

Between 2006 and 2009, artist Dan McPharlin produced a set of tiny 3D pieces called the Analogue Miniatures. Rather than being accurate representations of real synths such as the Minimoog or ARP 2600, they instead were meant to evoke what might have happened if, in McPharlin’s words, “a revisionist history where analogue technology continued to flourish uninterrupted.”
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Between 2006 and 2009, artist Dan McPharlin produced a set of tiny 3D pieces called the Analogue Miniatures. Rather than being accurate representations of real synths such as the Minimoog or ARP 2600, they instead were meant to evoke what might have happened if, in McPharlin’s words, “a revisionist history where analogue technology continued to flourish uninterrupted.”

Some combine computer screens with modular patch bays, others feature reel-to-reel tape decks integrated into the imaginary synthesizer, one has a mallet interface reminiscent of the Buchla Marimba Lumina, and all come off like the sorts of mash-ups (be they of instruments, cities, vehicles, or what have you) of different elements that we usually experience only in more vivid dreams.

To view the full set of Analogue Miniatures, visit the artist’s Flickr page.