Quartet San Francisco QSF Plays Brubeck

First, a disclaimer: There are no keyboards on this album. Now that that’s out of the way, QSF Plays Brubeck is still highly worth checking out for any keyboard aficionado, thanks to the group’s unpredictable arrangements of classic Dave Brubeck tracks — and the vivacious performances thereof. “The Golden Horn” is a prime example of how much variation QSF can pull out of the string quartet format; percussion, bass lines, harmonized melodies, and even simulated horn stabs emerge with a freshness and power that seem far too great to have come from the meager instrumentation of twin violins, viola, and cello. Paul Desmond’s quintessentially- Brubeck composition “Take Five” is also a highlight, featuring sinuously harmonized melodies over that unmistakable groove. An outstanding reinvention of a classic jazz piano hero’s work. (ViolinJazz Recordings, violinjazz.
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First, a disclaimer: There are no keyboards on this album. Now that that’s out of the way, QSF Plays Brubeck is still highly worth checking out for any keyboard aficionado, thanks to the group’s unpredictable arrangements of classic Dave Brubeck tracks — and the vivacious performances thereof. “The Golden Horn” is a prime example of how much variation QSF can pull out of the string quartet format; percussion, bass lines, harmonized melodies, and even simulated horn stabs emerge with a freshness and power that seem far too great to have come from the meager instrumentation of twin violins, viola, and cello. Paul Desmond’s quintessentially- Brubeck composition “Take Five” is also a highlight, featuring sinuously harmonized melodies over that unmistakable groove. An outstanding reinvention of a classic jazz piano hero’s work.
(ViolinJazz Recordings, violinjazz.

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