Ludovico Einaudi On Modern Classical

Ludovico’s Einaudi’s Nightbook is a fitting sonic snapshot of the acclaimed Italian pianist and composer. Pulling together elements of acoustic, minimalist composition, electronica, and cinematic soundscapes, the album is at once aurally varied and thematically unified.
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Ludovico’s Einaudi’s Nightbook is a fitting sonic snapshot of the acclaimed Italian pianist and composer. Pulling together elements of acoustic, minimalist composition, electronica, and cinematic soundscapes, the album is at once aurally varied and thematically unified.

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“I’ve been involved with electronics for a long time,” Einaudi relays from Milan, Italy. “I got interested in computers, and started doing experiments using electronics in my music. You can hear this in my earlier albums as well. In Nightbook, I started working with the electronica artist and percussionist Robert Lippock. We had been working together in live shows, both with my own project and the band White Tree, a trio with Robert and his brother Ronald on drums. So it feels completely natural to work with him in the studio as well as live — we collaborate often.”

Einaudi’s multi-dimensional sound is culled from a myriad of influences that literally cover all the musical bases. “My music developed over many years — it really was a process. I grew up listening to a lot of pop and rock music of the time. That was the foundation. But also, my mother was playing classical piano when I was growing up. So I began hearing Chopin and Bach very early in life. Later, I listened to all kinds of music. I went through different phases, studying 20th-century composition: Stravinsky and Bartok, and also American minimalist composers such as Terry Riley and Phillip Glass. I got interested in Keith Jarrett’s solo work, and the modal jazz of Miles Davis, around the time of his album Bitches Brew. So there were many different sounds that interested me, and endedup becoming a part of my music.”

Einaudi’s eclectic yet accessible blend of seemingly disparate musical genres and sounds has not gone unnoticed. His music has appeared in countless film and television soundtracks, and his last album Divenire made the Top Ten on Billboard’s Classical Crossover chart, and reached the top spot on the iTunes classical chart. His latest release Nightbook is already off to strong sales worldwide, proving that his genre-defying sound is indeed catching on globally.

“I decided to follow what was interesting and moving to me,” Einaudi says. “I never wanted to stay in a box. Music for me is the freedom and expression of all the desires I have inside.���